Developers Introduce ‘Preposit’ To Combat Tougher Lending Conditions

What do you do when you need to sell a massive backlog of apartments still on the market due to tightening lending conditions from the banks? You introduce a post pay method for home seekers who are struggling to save for a deposit.

First there was Afterpay now there is Preposit!

For those of you who aren’t familiar with the concept, Afterpay is a digital service that makes it possible to buy something now and pay it off in fortnightly instalments over a set period of time. Unlike a layby, you’ll get the product right away, whether you’re shopping online or in-store. And in the best circumstances, you’ll pay nothing more ie. provided you can afford the repayments.

Now however, Apartments WA are offering ‘preposit’, a service that enables struggling home buyers to rent while saving for a deposit as reported in the Australian Financial Review, ie. the Afterpay of the real estate industry.

Buyers can literally move in today and pay tomorrow, the only catch being that you need to be able to afford your loan repayments and prequalify for a loan.

It is estimated that over the next two years, there will be approximately 200,000 new apartments coming onto the market, of which most are in high-rise developments. A worrying thought to many seeing it has been well documented of recent especially in Brisbane that there is currently an over-supply of apartments with developers resorting to extreme incentives to sell them.

For example, at present developers are offering $50,000 cash incentives plus GST on top of regular sales and advisory commissions to sell luxury apartments around Melbourne.

Some are also offering thousands of dollars worth of designer furniture to be included in the sales, just to get it closed early.

Proposit – the company offering this service, states that it stores the payments in weekly instalments until the deposit amount has been reached, then give back to the buyer toward purchasing the apartment.

Although this may seem like an appealing option to those who can’t seem to save enough for that first deposit, it is very important to take into account the risk factors and additional costs that could be associated with using the service such as interest rates.

The other thing to take into account is oversupply often means that should you wish to sell your home down the line, it may be more difficult to or you may not get a price you are happy with. This particularly applies to first home buyers who often get caught up in the excitement without thinking that they may want to buy a house later on down the track yet wont have any capital growth for a decade due to the massive oversupply.

That being said, as with any large purchase, the best time to get into the property market is when you feel confident and financially ready.

 

 

 

It Pays To Be A Good Kid – Tougher Lending Terms & Conditions See Bank Of Mum & Dad Rise 25%

Tougher conditions imposed by banks, rate rises, increased minimum deposits and harsher repayment terms, has seen parental lending increase by 25 per cent to about $20 billion in the past 12 months as reported by the Australian Financial Review, and it’s only going to get worse according to RBA governor Philip Lowe and ANZ CEO Shayne Elliot, who both warned this week that loans will become even more difficult to get after the poor behaviour of banks exposed in the banking royal commission.

In staggering findings, the Bank of Mum and Dad, a term coined to describe parent lending to their children for property purchases, is now the tenth largest lender in the country, bigger than ME Bank, AMP Bank and the local operations of global banking giants like Citigroup and HSBC Australia.

Younger property buyers increasing reliance on parents to get into the property market reflects tougher lending conditions and difficulty saving deposits in rapidly rising property markets.

Martin North, Principal of Digital Finance Analytics, which complies the annual survey on parent financing of home loans, confirmed this commenting that “savings for a deposit is very difficult at a time when many lenders are requiring a larger deposit as loan to value rules are rising”.

Furthermore, younger buyers also find it difficult to save because of flat incomes, rising costs and the need to have a sizeable deposit to qualify for generous state-government first home owner grants.

At this stage, more than 55 per cent of first time home buyers require financial assistance from their parents, with the average cash contribution being around $89,000.

Yet despite the fact that the number of children needing financial assistance getting into the property market is increasing, the total number of first time home buyers continues to fall, meaning many without parental support could be giving up.

There are risks however associated with this strategy for both the parents and the children, especially if prices continue to fall from current levels, however for many, it’s really the only way to get a foot in the door.

 

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